Parent time and holidays

In a previous post, the possible impact of military deployment on parenting time was reviewed. However, there are other matters that can affect visitation in Salt Lake City and across Utah, such as holidays. From Mother's Day to Father's Day and a child's birthday, it is pivotal for parents to understand how their parenting schedules are affected by certain days on the calendar.

Parenting time schedules outline how long a non-custodial parent can spend time with his or her child, according to the Utah Courts. Sometimes, parents are unable to agree on a parenting schedule, in which case the state has set forth a schedule which dictates the minimum amount of time non-custodial parents can spend with their kids (the guidelines vary for children of different ages). For children, as well as their parents, holidays are often a very special time to form memories and enjoy time together and these guidelines also dictate which holidays parents will have with their children.

According to the Utah State Legislature, children are able to spend time with their father on Father's Day and their mother on Mother's Day from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. each year. In Utah, non-custodial parents can spend time with their child on certain holidays during odd-numbered years (such as the 4th of July, Veteran's Day and the first half of Christmas break). During even-numbered years, non-custodial parents have access to their kids on other holidays (such as the child's birthday, Memorial Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving and the second half of Christmas break).

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