Child support guidelines reflect modern ideals

While many Utah family law guidelines are intended to account for the best interests of the child in a divorce case, many would argue that some policies have reflected and reinforced gender bias through the years. Slowly, however, the law may be catching up with contemporary principles, since there’s evidence to suggest that child support agreements established across the country increasingly have fathers receiving financial support from their exes.

Establishing child support payments is intended to account for the financial needs of children following divorce. As such, the process involves identifying the parent that was physically responsible for the kids the majority of the time during the marriage, while also recognizing the parent that provided for the household financially. Once it’s determined which party was the primary breadwinner prior to divorce, an appropriate support plan can be created.

Now that more mothers across the country are providing for their families financially as well as physically, child custody arrangements everywhere are reflecting the shift in family dynamics. In 2013, a Pew Research study found that single mothers were responsible for heading approximately 25 percent of American households. Beyond that, around 40 percent households were financially supported by mothers. That’s why more mothers than ever before are now responsible for paying child support.

Complementing statistics suggesting that mothers are taking on more financial responsibilities are figures pointing to the fact that more fathers are the primary caregivers in a family. Full or primary custody was awarded to fathers in around 16 percent of cases in 2011, and a large percentage of those cases resulted in the dads being granted child support.

In order to ensure that child support arrangements reflect the priorities and needs of every family, individuals should always consult an experienced Salt Lake City, Utah, family law attorney.

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